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object
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Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)
Canada; British Columbia; Mount Waddington Regional District; Quatsino; ; Vancouver Island Group; ; Vancouver Island
23/8256

object
Chief's headdress representing a killer whale with a raven on his back

Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)
Canada; British Columbia; Mount Waddington Regional District; Quatsino; ; Vancouver Island Group; ; Vancouver Island
23/8252

2 items
  • Description:

    View of a potlatch ceremony, Christmas 1958, with six people seated or standing on a raised platform with a painted backdrop behind them (NMAI 238256.000), Christmas trees on either side, and a stage area behind a basketball hoop with views with a Russian (?) theme. From L: Susan (Mrs. Tom Patch) Wamiss, Charlie George Jr., George Scow, Charles Nowell (or Dick Flanders?), Willie Seaweed (wearing NMAI 238252.000), and Tom Patch Wamiss. They wear various headdresses and button blankets, and masks lay on the platform in front of them. All of the carvings, except for Charlie George's headdress---his own work---are by Willie and Joe Seaweed.

  • Culture/People:

    Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl)

  • Date created:

    December 25, 1958

  • Photographer:

    Wilhelm Helmer, Non-Indian

  • Place:

    Alert Bay; Mount Waddington Regional District; British Columbia; Canada

  • Collection History/Provenance:

    Wilhelm Helmer was a dealer in Indian art in British Columbia during the 1950s and 1960s; he sold two of the items pictured here to MAI in 1966.

  • Dimensions:

    7.5 x 9.5 in.

  • Catalog number:

    P19277

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