CONFERENCE
Native Identity in the 21st Century
Saturday, February 7, 2009
1–5:15 p.m.
Diker Pavilion, George Gustav Heye Center
National Museum of the American Indian, New York

Join us for a day of discussion and examination of Native Identity.

Topics include New Definitions of Indianness and Urban Calling–Where Art and Native Identity Meet.

Keynote address by award-winning author David Treuer (Ojibwa), University of Minnesota. Participants include Cara Cowan Watts (Cherokee), Cherokee Tribal Council of Oklahoma; Randy Reinholz (Choctaw), San Diego State University and the Autry Museum; artist, Jeffrey Gibson (Mississippi Band Choctaw/Cherokee); Charlene Teters (Spokane), activist and professor at the Institute of American Indian Arts; and a dramatic monologue from Tales of an Urban Indian by author/actor Darrell Dennis (Shuswap Nation). Moderators: NYU Silver Professor Karen Kupperman and NYU Asst. Professor Noelle Stout (Cherokee).

Presented in collaboration with the Native People’s Forum
at New York University and The Public Theater.

STORYTELLING
January 24, 2009
10:30 a.m.–3 p.m.
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.
The museum will celebrate traditional and contemporary storytelling from a variety of Native communities during the Winter Storytelling Festival. Throughout the museum, listen, watch, and learn how to tell stories not only with words but with string, dance, and art.

SPECIAL PROGRAM
January 23, 2009
10:30 a.m.
Potomac Atrium
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.
Join artist Bunky Echo-Hawk (Pawnee/Yakama) as he paints live with audience input. By engaging young people in discussion about Native American issues, the artist will create a painting on the spot. Recommended for grades 9-12. To reserve space, call 202-633-6644 or email NMAI-GroupReservations@si.edu.

FILM PROGRAM
"FILM INDIANS NOW!"
December 6, 2008
2 p.m.
East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
This program is presented by the National Museum of the American Indian and the National Gallery of Art and screens films that impart fresh views regarding the Native American experience. On Dec. 6, the newly re-mastered version of Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather (1972, 175 min.) will be screened. Themes in the movie such as cultural displacement, the realization of the American dream, and family allegiances resonate and parallel many issues Native Americans face today. Following the film, there will be a moderated discussion with Hanay Geiogamah (Kiowa/Delaware), filmmaker Chris Eyre (Cheyenne/Arapaho), and National Museum of the American Indian director Kevin Gover (Pawnee/Comanche).

CONFERENCE
December 4 & 5, 2008
“Images of the American Indian, 1600–2000”

Thursday, December 4
Elmer and Mary Louise Rasmuson Theater
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.
(Main entrance at Third Street & Maryland Avenue, SW)

Friday, December 5
East Building Auditorium
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
(East Building entrance at Fourth Street & Constitution Avenue, NW)

A Wyeth Foundation for American Art Conference presented by the National Gallery of Art Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, “Images of the American Indian, 1600–2000”  is held on the occasion of the exhibitions George de Forest Brush: The Indian Paintings (September 14, 2008–January 4, 2009) and Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian (November 1, 2008–August 16, 2009, National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.; November 1, 2008–May 17, 2009, National Museum of the American Indian, George Gustav Heye Center, New York).

Schedule and participant information (PDF)

TEACHER WORKSHOP
Teaching with Images: Shaping Views of American Indians
November 8, 2008
8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.
In celebration of the exhibition, Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian, this workshop will help teachers integrate contemporary images of Native peoples into classroom discussions through an interdisciplinary focus on contemporary social, political, and environmental issues. Teachers are encouraged to team up across subject areas (i.e., art, social studies/history, language arts, special education) for this workshop. Visit Education for more information on registering for workshops.

CURATORIAL TALK
November 1, 2008
1-2 p.m.
Rasmuson Theater
National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.
In celebration of the opening weekend of the new exhibition, Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian, join curators Truman Lowe (Ho-Chunk) and Paul Chaat Smith (Comanche) for an in-depth discussion on Scholder's work and the museum's concurrent Scholder exhibitions in Washington and New York. Book signing to follow.

This program was made possible by a gift from Loren and Anne Kieve.