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Jeffrey Gibson
In 2004, painter and installation artist Jeffrey Gibson (Choctaw/Cherokee, b. 1972) began creating fantastical landscapes using layers of intensely colored marks, glossy and transparent pours, and his signature pigmented silicone. The environment he has created and explored with his work in the last few years reveals a narrative of emergence into a utopian state, which will lead, inevitably, to corruption and collapse.

“Utopia was important for me to envision and relates to my being Native American and having grown up solely in a Western consumer culture. My desire to act out the role of an explorer depicting an inviting landscape, via painting and specimen retrieval, was a reaction to Native tribes’ being consistently described as part of a nostalgic and romantic vision of pre-colonized Indian life. The aesthetic of these paintings and sculptures came from turn-of-the-century Iroquois whimsies, contemporary and historic powwow regalia, cultural adornment of non-Western cultures, techno rave and club culture, and earlier utopian models.”

—Jeffrey Gibson, 2006

Image of artwork

Camouflage, 2004
Oil and pigmented silicone on wood
79 x 76 cm.
Collection of Camilio Alvarez and Alexandra Cherubini

Image of artwork

The First Principle, 2004
Oil and pigmented silicone on wood
117 x 142 cm.
Collection of the artist

Image of artwork

Unconscious Potencies, 2005
Oil and pigmented silicone on wood
150 x 122 cm.
Collection of the artist

Image of artwork

Natura Non Facit Saltum, 2005
Oil and pigmented silicone on wood
150 x 122 cm.
Collection of the artist

Image of artwork

Submerge, 2007
Acrylic, oil, and spray paint on canvas
213 x 305 cm.
Collection of the artist